So when the netizens were done translating, many of them were offended because the singer is not Black. WHY SHE WAS CRITICIZED. It certainly is not for a lack of Black Latinx talent. 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Why or why not? Nada tiene sentido si no estás tú (tú) Antes no tomaba y ya me muero en el alcohol Recuerdo en el Ferrari cómo hacíamos el amor (mami) Yo siempre seré tu negrita del Bronx. “It’s a nickname that should be phased out of the Spanish language as it’s extremely insensitive to Afro-Latinx.”, Tanya Katerí Hernández is the Archibald R. Murray professor of law at Fordham University School of Law, where she teaches anti-discrimination law and critical race theory, among other courses. Obviously, that lyric is causing loads of controversy and fans and critics alike are letting Lopez know they’re out OK with it. In other words, anti-Black racism exists and is alive and well, throughout Latin America. Actress and singer Jennifer Lopez finds herself in the middle of an online controversy following the release of "Lonely" with Colombian singer Maluma.. And if so, how? In fact, the source of many of today’s popular music and dance traditions, such as Salsa, Merengue, Bachata and Reggeaton were invented and generated by Black-Latinxs. Are there good or bad times ahead financially? Submit your essay to this week’s question. Hernández: The notion that Latin American racial understandings are so different than those in the United States is quite overblown. Te necesito, estoy solo Si la cagué, amor, lo siento (lo siento) Tú eres mi nena, nadie es igual Deja el ego, que te va a matar When you heard the song, or learned of this line from the song, how did it come across to you? On this day in 1965, a groundbreaking ceremony was held for a multi-purpose stadium for San Diego in Mission Valley. In the song, Lopez sings "yo siempre seré tu negrita del Bronx," which directly translates to "I will always be your black girl from the Bronx." While there has certainly been a longstanding rhetoric about racial mixture in the region, Whiteness is the preferred currency. Readers React: Pandemic wrong time to be propping up vacation rentals, Councilmember Jen Campbell ignores pleas from her constituents, Privacy PolicyTerms of ServiceSign Up For Our Newsletters, Copyright © 2020, The San Diego Union-Tribune |, Maluma and Jennifer López in a scene from the video for “Lonely.”, ICU availability in Southern California at 0%, and it’s going to get worse, officials warn, are over-represented in the U.S. prison population, worse living conditions and life outcomes, Latinidad is experienced as a category that excludes Black Latinxs, Black people in the American Hemisphere and beyond, Final stretch on COVID-19 economic relief as jobless claims surge. Yo siempre seré tu negrita del Bronx Te necesito, estoy lonely Si la cagué, baby I'm sorry Tú ere' mi shorty, nadie es igual Deja el ego, que te va a matar You're sayin' that you're feelin' lonely But you fucked up, baby, I'm sorry I'm doing so much better without you Just kill your ego before it kills you Papi Juancho (yeah, nobody like him) Uttering the words in Spanish doesn’t make them immune from being evaluated by non-Spanish speaking Blacks and others. This is, in part, because “Negro” was, and still is, closely associated with enslavement. Many in Latin America and the Caribbean tout racial mixture as a source of pride, and as a reason why they cannot be called racist, even as they perpetrate anti-Black micro-aggressions and racism. This would have surely softened the blow that many Black Latinxs felt when they heard her claiming to be a “negrita.” Frankly, by not taking advantage of her global platform to support and amplify calls to end violence and oppression, it is apparent that she is indifferent and/or willfully ignorant about the social ills affecting Black lives globally. Yo siempre seré tu negrita del Bronx [Maluma & Jennifer Lopez] Te necesito, estoy lonely (Yeah) Si la cagué, baby, I'm sorry (I'm sorry) Tú ere' mi shorty, nadie es igual (Ay) Deja el ego, que te va a matar You're sayin' that you're feelin' lonely But you fucked up, baby, I'm sorry (Sorry) I'm doing so much better without you (Without you) In the recently released song “Lonely,” by Colombian artist Maluma and Jennifer Lopez, Lopez sings “yo siempre seré tu negrita del Bronx,” which roughly translates to “I’ll always be your little Black girl from the Bronx”. As it currently stands, Latinidad is experienced as a category that excludes Black Latinxs, and so when Latinidad is invoked or imagined, a person like J.Lo or Ricky Martin comes readily to mind, whereas Jharrel Jerome and Joan Smalls do not. And how has the use of the term evolved into one of endearment? Lopez’s tactic is what I call the “I can’t be racist, I’m Latino” defense to racial reckoning. Q: There’s been quite a bit of backlash over Lopez referring to herself as “tu negrita del Bronx,” in the song “Lonely” with Colombian artist Maluma. Get top headlines from the Union-Tribune in your inbox weekday mornings, including top news, local, sports, business, entertainment and opinion. Yo siempre seré tu negrita del Bronx [Maluma & Jennifer Lopez] Te necesito, estoy lonely (Yeah) Si la cagué, baby, I'm sorry (I'm sorry) Tú ere' mi shorty, nadie es igual (Ay) Deja el ego, que te va a matar. “Yo siempre seré tu negrita del Bronx,” says the new song by JLo featuring Maluma, which translated into English would go something like “I will always be your little black girl from The Bronx.” For those who naturally navigate both languages, the translation makes as much noise as trying to make sense of the original phrase. The term has its origins in the colonial slave societies of Latin America and the Caribbean. Moreover, Black social justice movement activists in Latin America have been doing the work of documenting how anti-Blackness exists and systematically excludes Afro-Latinos from socio-economic opportunities. //
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